Not flossing

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There is something that bonds gum disease and heart disease, Dr. Ostfeld says. Even though there is no clear explanation as yet as to why these two diseases affect each other, this has become a very big concern. When you don’t floss, sticky, bacteria-laden plaque form over time that eventually results in gum disease.

Treat You Gum Disease

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One very acceptable theory is that the bacteria can trigger inflammation within the body. “Inflammation promotes all aspects of atherosclerosis,” Dr. Ostfeld explains. So this would become a bigger problem than just a petty gum disease. Treating gum disease will surely benefit the blood vessel function.

Withdrawing From Society

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We as humans go through loads of emotions and each day is a different one compared to the next. Hence some days we often find ourselves feeling annoyed, irritated, and just plain difficult to get along with other people. But we should always keep in mind that we need to strengthen the bond with those close to our hearts.

Avoid Shutting Yourself Off

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Those who have a very close link to their family, friends, and society in general usually end up living longer and healthier lives. We all require some alone time from time to time, but you should never cut yourself off from the rest of the world. It is never healthy to shut yourself off from those dearest to you.

All Or Nothing

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We can even nickname this the Weekend Warrior Syndrome. “I see so many people in their 40s and 50s dive into exercising with good intentions, hurt themselves, and then stop exercising altogether,” claims Judith S. Hochman, MD, director of the Cardiovascular Clinical Research Center at NYU’s Langone Medical Center.

Slow And Sure

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We must always remember the exercise is not something to be hurried with. It is always wise to aim for a slow and steady progress. “It’s more important to have a regular exercise commitment,” Dr. Reynolds adds, “Be in it for the long game.” It is not a game but a lifestyle that one needs to slowly adapt.